The Shocking Murder of Edmond Allen near Tipperary – 1886

Shocking Murder of Edmund Allen near Tipperary - unknown source from U of T search

On Saturday evening a brutal murder was committed at a place called Shronell, situated about 3 miles from the town of Tipperary, but does not seem to be connected with agrarian matters. The victim was a farmer named Edmond Allen, living at Park, near Galbally, in this county. Deceased, who was about 35 years of age, left his house at midday on Saturday for Damerville, Shronell, the residence of Mr. Austin Chadwick, for the purpose of taking back a farm horse which a few days ago was lent to him by Mr. Chadwick’s land steward, John Tobin. He arrived at Damerville about half-past 4 o’clock. He remained there half an hour, and then left for home, a distance of seven miles. He was seen walking down the avenue and passing out of the entrance gate. At the Shronell side of Damerville gate is a high wall, closing in the kitchen garden of Shronell House. By these two high enclosures is formed for about one hundred yards a regular alley. In this lane-like place a few minutes past five o’clock was found stretched on the middle of the road the lifeless body of the murdered man Allen. The persons who found the body were Patrick O’Neil, grocer, Lattin, Michael Daly, and Thomas Looby, who live near Lattin. There was no blood on the face of deceased nor on his person or clothes, nor any marks whatever of violence. Hence the men concluded deceased had suddenly died a natural death. They did not know who he was, and they searched his pockets for any papers which might have been about him that would reveal his identity. These they found. One of the three men then ran up  to Thomas Brown’s public house, at the Cross of Shronell, and informed Brown of the matter. Brown is a second cousin of deceased. Brown and his son-in-law, an ex-policeman, David Hoey, at once proceeded on their car to the scene of the outrage. They placed the body on the car and drove back to their house. On arriving there they immediately sent for Dr. Condon, of Shronell. On the doctor’s arrival they removed the clothes from the body, when it was seen that the man had been foully murdered. There were three bullet wounds on the back, one near the shoulder-blade, another a little lower down, and the third directly opposite the heart. They were pistol shots. Evidently he was fired at from behind. Two of the bullets lodged in the body, and death must have been instantaneous. It appears the deceased had quarrelled with his neighbours at Galbally about a right of passage, and litigation was begun more than 13 months ago, and has not yet terminated. It is stated a man was sent to gaol for three months at the prosecution of deceased in an assault case, arising out of the contention of the right of passage. Deceased was a Protestant, and was well-known in Tipperary, where he had several relatives. He was a second cousin of Allen, one of the three Manchester “martyrs.” He was a widower, and had no family. He held a comfortable farm, on which he kept sixteen cows.


Murder of Edmund Allen - London North News and Finsbury Gazette - 18860123

A well-to-do farmer named Edmond Allen, of Galbally, county Limerick, has been shot dead at Shronell, near Tipperary, and about seven miles from his home. The body, on being discovered, was conveyed to a neighbouring inn. Three pistol-bullet wounds were found in the unfortunate man’s back, indicating that he had been fired at from behind. It seems that Allen had quarrelled with his neighbours with respect to a right of way, and a course of litigation with them had not ceased at the time of his death, but whether this circumstance has had anything to do with the murder has not yet been shown. The unfortunate man was a Protestant. The Tipperary branch of the National League have unanimously passed a resolution condemning the outrage, and expressing hope that the perpetrators will be brought to justice.

London North News and Finsbury Gazette, January 23, 1886.